Inspiring Youth at Merit Badge Challenge!

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Written by Administrator Friday, 20 March 2015 18:20

Inspiration and excitement.  Those were the two emotions expressed by those in the Cinemotography Merit Badge Class at the Merit Badge Challenge at Fairfield High School.  And those two words seemed to echo across multiple sites and communities across the Dan Beard Council.  

4 different sites hosted nearly 2,000 Scouts throughout January, February, and March to help them work on Merit Badges, and more importantly, gain new experiences and exposure to interesting activities and potential careers.  "These kids have an opportunity to see and participate in things they have never experienced before," said Tom Montgomery, founder of the Fairfield site Merit Badge Challenge nearly 20 years ago.   "Everything from creating a movie, to home cooking, to learning how to properly extinguish a fire."  Upon my vist, the depth of opportutnites across the various sites was certainly clear.  But what stood out even more was the subject matter.  I watched as one group of Scouts worked feverishly to assemble their robot.  Using laptops to program the chips on them, disassembling, making adjustments, reassembling, and then watching as they put their creation to life.  I found myself completely enthralled as I listened to the Northern Kentucky Search and Rescue team explain to a group of Scouts how precise a rescue dog can be and showcasing some of his skills.  And I watched as Scouts faces lit up with excitement as they got to learn how to properly use a fire hose thanks to the local fire department in Bethel.   

Merit Badge Challenge is a Council wide event that helps to pair Scouts with counselors and industry professionals to help them earn various Merit Badges.  Between the 4 different sites, nearly 100 different merit badges are offered.  This year's sites included Fairfield High School, Sycamore High School, Dixie Heights High School in Northern Kentucky, and Grant Career Center in Bethel.  Scouts gather over the course of 2 to 3 Saturdays to work on multiple merit badges.  Each of the venues offer a variety of merit badge options and they try to have a little bit of fun in the process.  The Fairfield site awards a mock Oscar trophy each year for best film in its Cinematography Merit Badge Class.  The award is voted on by the youth and presented at the final closing.  "Our goal is for the kids to have some fun, gain exposure to some new things, and learn a few new life skills along the way," said one of the leaders at the Dixie Heights site.  "We know one day they'll look back and think to themselves 'When did I learn that?' and realize it was in Scouting.  

Check out some of the photos and video from the 2015 Merit Badge Challenge:

   
Scouts experience what it is like and the proper technique to use a firehose. Scouts gather in the main area at Dixie Heights between classes. Scouts get to see two members of the Search and Rescue squad and hear about the techniques used.



Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 April 2015 00:40  

Merit Badge Challenge 2015

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Written by Administrator Tuesday, 10 August 2010 19:14

*NEW THIS YEAR:

Scouts can enter a contest to design the patch for Merit Badge Challenge!  Design your own patch concept, submit it online, and we'll work with the winner to create the official Merit Badge Challenge patch for 2015. Check out all of the contest rules and submit your design at:

www.danbeard.org/MBCpatch

 

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To register online, start by selecting/clicking the location you would like to register for. 
You can watch a short video below that will walk you through the process as well.
Fairfield High School (North/West Area): January 31, February 14, & February 28, 2015 (Snow date 3/14)


Sycamore High School (Central Area): February 7, February 21, & February 28, 2015 (Snow date 3/21) - Also available- Den Chief Training and Adult Leader Trainings (Venturing Leader Specific, Boy Scout Leader Specific, and CPR - Feb 21 & Feb 28
*Please note, Venture Crew Committee Challenge training has been moved to Feb. 28)


Bethel at Grant Career Center (East Area): February 28, March 7, & March 21, 2015 (Snow date 3/28)


Dixie Heights High School (South Area): February 28, March 21, 2015


*New Process for Registration:
October 1, 2014: Merit Badge Class Schedule Matrix will be Published Here
November 8, 2014: Online registration will open for all locations at 8 am *updated 11/3/14
December 29, 2014: Registrations will close for all locations

 

 

*Updated 11/8 @ 11:50am

Updated overview video of the registration process.  The video now also shows how to make an edit/change using the grey summary box when going through registration.  Did you accidentally click the wrong activity?  Remove it using the summary box (not the browser back button).  Use the Scout Info Collection Sheet below to collect each participants information prior to online registration. 

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 February 2015 21:48

Read more...

 

The New Cooking Merit Badge Requirements That Will be Released

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Written by Administrator Wednesday, 08 January 2014 00:31

cooking-mb-old-and-new
The new Cooking merit badge requirements

Requirements

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the most likely hazards you may encounter while participating in cooking activities and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, and respond to these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses that could occur while preparing meals and eating, including burns and scalds, cuts, choking, and allergic reactions.
    3. Describe how meat, fish, chicken, eggs, dairy products, and fresh vegetables should be stored, transported, and properly prepared for cooking. Explain how to prevent cross-contamination.
    4. Describe the following food-related illnesses and tell what you can do to help prevent each from happening:
      1. Salmonella
      2. Staphylococcal aureus
      3. Escherichia coli (E. coli)
      4. Clostridium botulinum (Botulism)
      5. Campylobacter jejuni
      6. Hepatitis
      7. Listeria monocytogenes
      8. Cryptosporidium
      9. Norovirus
    5. Discuss with your counselor food allergies, food intolerance,
      food-related diseases, and your awareness of these concerns.
  2. Do the following:
    1. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, give five examples for EACH of the following food groups, the recommended number of daily servings, and the recommended serving size:
      1. Fruits
      2. Vegetables
      3. Grains
      4. Proteins
      5. Dairy
    2. Explain why you should limit your intake of oils and sugars.
    3. Determine your daily level of activity and your caloric need based on your activity level. Then, based on the MyPlate food guide, discuss with your counselor an appropriate meal plan for yourself for one day.
    4. Discuss your current eating habits with your counselor and what you can do to eat healthier, based on the MyPlate food guide.
  3. Do the following:
    1. Discuss the following food label terms: calorie, fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrate, dietary fiber, sugar, protein. Explain how to calculate total carbohydrates and nutritional values for two servings, based on the serving size specified on the label.
    2. Refer to “How to Read a Food Label” in the Cooking merit badge pamphlet, and name ingredients that help the consumer identify the following allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, and shellfish.
  4. Do the following:
    1. Discuss EACH of the following cooking methods. For each one, describe the equipment needed and name at least one food that can be cooked using that method: baking, boiling, pan frying, simmering, steaming, microwaving, and grilling.
    2. Discuss the benefits of using a camp stove on an outing vs. a charcoal or wood fire.
    3. Discuss how the Outdoor Code and no-trace principles pertain
      to cooking in the outdoors.

Note: The meals prepared for Cooking merit badge requirements 5, 6, and 7 will count only toward fulfilling those requirements and will not count toward rank advancement. Meals prepared for rank advancement may not count toward the Cooking merit badge. You must not repeat any menus for meals actually prepared or cooked in requirements 5, 6, and 7.

  1. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for three full days of meals (three breakfasts, three lunches, and three dinners) plus one dessert. Your menu should include enough to feed yourself and at least one adult, keeping in mind any special needs (such as food allergies) of those to be served. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    1. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    2. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.
    3. Using at least five of the seven cooking methods from requirement 4, prepare and serve yourself and at least one adult (parent, family member, guardian, or other responsible adult) one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one dessert from the meals you planned.*
    4. Time your cooking to have each meal ready to serve at the proper time. Have an adult verify the preparation of the meal to your counselor.
    5. After each meal, ask a person you served to evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure a successful meal.
    6. Explain how you kept foods safe and free from cross-contamination.
  2. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for your patrol (or a similar size group of up to eight youth, including you) for a camping trip. Include five meals AND at least one snack OR one dessert. List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    1. Create a shopping list for your meals showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    2. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor.
    3. In the outdoors, cook two of the meals you planned in requirement 6 using either a lightweight stove or a low-impact fire. Use a different cooking method for each meal.** The same fireplace may be used for both meals. Serve this meal to your patrol or a group of youth.
    4. In the outdoors, cook one of the meals you planned in requirement 6. Use either a Dutch oven, OR a foil pack, OR kabobs. Serve this meal to your patrol or a group of youth.**
    5. In the outdoors, prepare a dessert OR a snack and serve it to your patrol or a group of youth.**

* The meals for requirement 5 may be prepared on different days, and they need not be prepared consecutively. The requirement calls for Scouts to plan, prepare, and serve one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner to at least one adult; those served need not be the same for all meals.

** Where local regulations do not allow you to build a fire, the counselor may adjust the requirement to meet the law. The meals in requirements 6 and 7 may be prepared for different trips and need not be prepared consecutively. Scouts working on this badge in summer camp should take into consideration foods that can be obtained at the camp commissary.

    1. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, and then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your
      meals. Tell how better planning and preparation help ensure successful outdoor cooking.
    2. Explain how you kept foods safe and free from cross contamination.
  1. Using the MyPlate food guide or the current USDA nutrition model, plan a menu for trail hiking or backpacking that includes one breakfast, one lunch, one dinner, and one snack. These meals must not require refrigeration and are to be consumed by three to five people (including you). List the equipment and utensils needed to prepare and serve these meals. Then do the following:
    1. Create a shopping list for your meals, showing the amount of food needed to prepare and serve each meal, and the cost for each meal.
    2. Share and discuss your meal plan and shopping list with your counselor. Your plan must include how to repackage foods for your hike or backpacking trip to eliminate as much bulk, weight, and garbage as possible.
    3. While on a trail hike or backpacking trip, prepare and serve two meals and a snack from the menu planned for requirement 7. At least one of those meals must be cooked over a fire, or an approved trail stove (with proper supervision).**
    4. For each meal prepared in requirement 7c, use safe foodhandling practices. Explain how you kept foods safe and free from cross-contamination. Clean up equipment, utensils, and the site thoroughly after each meal. Properly dispose of dishwater, and pack out all garbage.
    5. After each meal, have those you served evaluate the meal on presentation and taste, then evaluate your own meal. Discuss what you learned with your counselor, including any adjustments that could have improved or enhanced your meals. Tell
      how better planning and preparation help ensure successful trail hiking or backpacking meals.
  2. Find out about three career opportunities in cooking. Select one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
 
 

Updates to Cooking Merit Badge

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Written by Administrator Wednesday, 08 January 2014 00:22

Cooking-EagleWhat’s changing?

There are two major revisions that should be considered separately.

The first is that Cooking merit badge will become Eagle-required beginning Jan. 1, 2014.
The second is a major overhaul to the requirements, which will take effect Jan. 1, 2015.  View the new requirements for the badge here




When will Cooking merit badge become required to earn the Eagle Scout Award?

Beginning Jan. 1, 2014. Regardless of when a Scout earned the Life rank or began working on Eagle, unless he fulfills all the requirements — with the exception of his board of review — before Jan. 1, 2014, he must earn the Cooking merit badge to become an Eagle Scout.


What about the new requirements?

The process for implementing changes to merit badges is covered in the Guide to Advancement, topic 7.0.4.2, “What to Do When Requirements Change.” The changes to Cooking will first appear in a revised merit badge pamphlet that will be released during 2013. The new requirements then become effective Jan. 1, 2015, with the release of Boy Scout Requirements, No. 34765.

 

What if a Scout has already started earning Cooking with the old requirements?

The Guide then allows the following options for the period of time between the release of the revised pamphlet and the Jan. 1, 2015, effective date:

If Scouts have already started on the merit badge, they may switch to the new requirements or continue with the old ones until the badge is completed.
If Scouts have not already started on the merit badge, they may opt to use the new requirements and the new pamphlet.
If work on the merit badge begins before Jan. 1, 2015, they may use the old requirements and old pamphlet until the badge is completed.

 

Is there a time limit involved?

The Guide to Advancement, under the same topic, goes on to say, “There is no time limit between starting and completing a badge, although a counselor may determine so much time has passed since any effort took place that the new requirements must be used.” This will apply to Cooking merit badge as well.

 

My Scout earned Cooking merit badge before it became Eagle-required. Does he have to earn it again?

No. Scouts who already earned Cooking merit badge are not required to re-earn the badge under the new requirements in order to qualify for Eagle.

 

The Eagle-required Cooking merit badge will have a silver border. Can a Scout who already earned Cooking switch his badge from the green-bordered version to one with the silver border?

Yes. Once the Supply Group has released a new Cooking merit badge patch with a silver border — signifying it is Eagle-required — then any Scout who earned and received a green-bordered Cooking patch (regardless which requirements were involved) may purchase or be presented with one that has a silver border.

A Cooking merit badge certificate or blue card must be presented to buy the new patch. The green-bordered patch may then be retained as a keepsake.

 

Can this Scout wear both versions on his sash?

No. Scouts are not permitted to wear both merit badge patches at the same time.

 

Will there be a trade-in program for exchanging for the silver version?

No.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 08 January 2014 00:35  

merit badges

Click here for the most current list of Merit Badges, as listed on the National BSA website.

New Merit Badges this year include Kayaking, Search and Rescue, and Welding.

 
 

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